Jackie Da Rosa - Century 21 North Shore/Storrs & DeNault



Posted by Jackie Da Rosa on 4/28/2019

When your kids wake up each morning refreshed and relaxed, their whole day is already off to a good start. Your kids’ bedroom plays a significant role in getting the sleep their body needs, but it’s more than just a room for sleeping. It’s also a place where they can unwind with their peers, so it needs to be cozy and neat. Give your kids the gift of a sound sleep by making their bedroom a pleasant retreat after a stressful day.

Make their stuff reachable

To help your kids stay comfortable and organized, make sure they will be able to reach their toys and other things they use daily. Your kids will use their closet storage and coat racks if they can easily reach them.

Bring their Cartoons closer to them

If your kid loves a specific cartoon or show, you can add a painting of their favorite animation or superhero characters like sponge bob, Dora, Peppa pig, etc. Doing this will make the room more friendly and unique.

Decorate the ceiling

You can add a painting of stars and a moon on your kid's ceiling. Using glow in the dark paint will give them joy when they turn out the lights at night. A cityscape at the edge of the room is a good idea too. If your kid is a lover of nature, you can bring the outdoors into the room by hiring an artist to paint different colored leaves and birds on the wall.

Make them multi-functional

As your kids grow, their room will need to accommodate a study desk, and more storage spaces for books and of course medals and trophies if you have a competitive kid. Buy multi-functional pieces of furniture that feature desk space with plenty of storage.

Good lighting

Be sure to incorporate multiple types of lighting in your child's room. Overhead lights and a reading light are both essential. A reading light is not only for studying. It can help your little one get to the bathroom in the middle of the night.

Keep their bed simple 

Your kid's bed should look cozy and simple, don't stuff in too many pillows. A single pillow and their favorite teddy by the corner is just perfect! 

Your kid's bedroom should make them happy

When furnishing your kid's room, let them voice out their opinion too. Rather than giving them, bold color like Yellow or orange, give your kids the chance to make their color choice. Handling the whole process is a bad idea, your kids to should be a place of solace and not where they would feel uncomfortable.




Tags: decorating   bedroom   kids  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Jackie Da Rosa on 6/24/2018

If you recently bought or sold a house, you may have only a short amount of time to pack up your belongings and get your family ready for moving day. As such, you'll need to tell your children about your upcoming move to ensure they can prepare accordingly.

Ultimately, informing your kids about your move can be difficult, especially for families that have lived in a particular city or town for many years. Lucky for you, we're here to help you minimize the stress commonly associated with telling your kids about moving day.

Here are three tips to ensure you can stay calm, cool and composed when you inform your kids about your decision to relocate.

1. Speak with Your Kids As Soon As Possible

The longer that you wait to tell your kids about your move, the tougher it will become to break the news to them. Thus, as soon as you decide to purchase or sell a home, you should tell your kids.

Remember, the sooner you speak with your children, the sooner they can start planning for the future. You also can discuss any moving concerns with your kids and ensure they can receive your full emotional support as moving day approaches.

2. Plan Ahead for Your Family Discussion

In most instances, kids will have lots of questions about your decision to move. As a parent, it is your responsibility to dedicate the necessary time and resources to respond to all of your kids' queries.

Consider your children's perspective before you inform your kids about your decision to buy or sell a house – you'll be glad you did. If you plan ahead for a discussion with your kids, you may be able to anticipate potential questions and be ready to provide thoughtful responses.

3. Be Honest

No parent has all the answers, all the time. And if you face children's questions about your move and are uncertain about how to respond to them, you should not hesitate to speak from the heart.

It may be impossible to have answers to all of your kids' questions about an upcoming move. However, if you're honest with your children, you can provide them with plenty of support throughout the moving cycle.

When it comes to discussing an upcoming move with kids, both parents and their children may get emotional. Fortunately, parents and children can work together to support one another and ensure all family members can reap the benefits of a successful transition to a new address.

Lastly, if you need extra help as you get ready to discuss an upcoming move with your kids, you can always consult with a real estate agent. In addition to helping you navigate the homebuying or home selling process, a real estate agent can provide honest, unbiased recommendations about the best ways to inform your children about your decision to buy or sell a residence.

Use the aforementioned tips, and you can take the guesswork out of telling your kids about your upcoming move.




Tags: moving tips   kids  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Jackie Da Rosa on 5/14/2017

A house fire is a parent and home owner's worst fear. Many people see tragic house fires as a case of very bad luck, but in reality most house fires can be avoided by practicing good fire safety. To prevent house fires and to know what to do in case you have one, you'll need to learn and teach your children about the main causes of house fires, how to prevent them, and what to do when a fire occurs. We'll cover all of that in this article, plus give you some tips on making it easy and fun for kids to learn.

How do house fires happen?

The eight most common causes of house fires are:
  1. candles
  2. smoking
  3. electrical/lighting
  4. dryers and washing machines
  5. lightning
  6. kids playing with fire
  7. tree decorations
  8. kitchen/cooking

Play investigator

To prevent some of the causes of fire listed above, gather your children and put on your investigator hat. Make a checklist of the following and scour your house together to search for clues of fire hazards, taking care of them as you go along. Look for:
  • Overloaded power strips and damaged power cords
  • Dryer vents that are clogged up or dirty
  • Stove burners that are near flammable items like curtains
  • Smoke detectors checked
  • Extra batteries located
  • Escape route noted (see below)
  • Ensure kids know the rules about candles, cooking, playing with fire, etc.

Plan your escape

Teaching kids a fire escape route can be tricky. It might get confusing for them or they might forget or panic in case of an actual fire. Therefore the best way to teach kids a fire escape plan is to practice it often. Have monthly or bi-monthly fire safety checks with your kids and go over your escape plan and test your smoke detectors. Yearly, participate in fire safety week, which also covers escape plans and best practices but turns it into a weeklong series of activities you can do with your kids. When it comes to the actual fire escape plan, grab some graphing paper and colored pencils and sit down with your kids to create your home. Include in your plan the names and escape routes (2 minimum) of each room and the outdoor meeting place. Have kids draw their own (age appropriate) to help them understand the plan better and get them involved. Once you've drawn the plan, run through it a few times with your kids. If you have infants or very young children who can't get themselves out of the house, plan who will retrieve them from their room in case of a fire. Remember to tell the kids not to wait for others before getting outside, and to not try to take belongings with them.

Stick to your routine

The hardest part about fire safety is making it a habit. At school, your kids have mandatory fire drills. At home, however, parents get busy with work or forget and tend to ignore fire safety. So, you'll have to find ways to make sure you and your family stick to the plan. If you have a family calendar hanging in your home, make sure you pencil in your bi-monthly fire safety meeting. Similarly, anyone in your family who uses a calendar on their phone or computer should add it there as well and invite the other family members. Make sure the event is fun for everyone to ensure no one dreads it. You could make a plan to take the kids out to dinner or somewhere fun after to make it a night everyone looks forward to every couple of months.